Archive for the ‘Rosa’ Category

Jolie with Pointy Sticks

August 18, 2012

Well! It only took me AGES, but I finally have a little collection of accessory patterns available, just in time for autumn.

I’ve talked a little about the philosophy behind this collection as I’ve worked on it, but I’m going to mention it again. The idea behind this collection was to create a somewhat cohesive set of accessories that could be mixed and matched to offset a fall and winter wardrobe. Like most knitters, I have an absolute ton of hats and cowls and mitts and such, but they’re often knit in isolation from one another and can’t really be worn together without making me look a little crazy. Watching old movies, one of the things that struck me about the curated wardrobes of the actresses was how well the accessories worked together. I wanted to create small patterns using minimal amounts of luxury yarn that would create a set of accessories that could be worn as part of a well matched wardrobe.

Myrna 3

Myrna cowl and mitts

I’ve listed two sets as individual patterns, meaning that while there are six patterns listed for the collection, there are actually instructions for eight different accessories: two hats, two cowls, two shawls, one set of mitts, and a cravat.

So let’s talk a little about the patterns! You’ve seen Rosa and Dorothy before.

Rosa and Dorothy

Rosa has been updated to include a second, larger size, and a second suggested yarn. Both suggested yarns are from Rocky Mountain Dyeworks. I love the rich colors that Hasmi, the creative force behind Rocky Mountain Dyeworks, teases out of fibers. The original red Rosa was knit in Bow Falls Fingering, a tight BFL. The new version is knit in Kicking Horse Sock, a merino/bamboo blend with a soft hand and oodles of drape. I asked Hasmi if she had any colors suggestive of a yellow rose, and she dyed me THREE absolutely gorgeous shades, which I alternated to create a subtle gradient from light to dark. I absolutely love the result. If you previously purchased Rosa, you should have received an update to the pattern, and if you wish to purchase the whole collection, the price of Rosa will be automatically discounted at purchase.

Dorothy is included in this collection as well, the only way to purchase the pattern through Knitting Kninja. Unlike my other shawl patterns, Dorothy is a raglan shawl, which makes it easy to drape over the shoulders and wear. It’s also easy to wrap around as a scarf. I used Knit Picks Imagination sock yarn for this version, an alpaca blend that adds a fuzzy halo to your knitting. Each section is fast and fun to knit, with a great deal of texture.

Clara

Clara is a bobble and lace hat. I don’t always love bobbles, but there’s something about a bobble hat that I adore. I have a saved picture in my files from ages ago of a bobble hat with diamond lace and I knew I wanted to make something similar one day. Clara is that something similar. It’s a one size hat, because the lace makes it very stretchy in order to fit a wide range of head sizes. Clara’s lace comes together in the decreases to make a star shaped top that just added to the fun little details. Knit in Sanguine Gryphon Traveller, it’s a warm hat despite the holes. I suggest substituting Cephalopod Yarns or Verdant Gryphon Traveller. Each skein is enough to make at least two hats.

Edith

Edith is a beret and cravat set knit in A Verb for Keeping Warm Metamorphosis. Metamorphosis is a gorgeous silk/merino blend with a somewhat rustic hand. The beret is covered in little twisted stitch cables that interlock and wind up the hat. They are echoed slightly in the ruffle cravat. The hat comes in two styles, a shallow beret (shown) and a slouchier version for those who want a little more substance. You can make a shallow beret and a cravat in any size from just one skein of yarn, which makes this a good value for an expensive and luxurious yarn.

Ida

Ida is a colorwork cowl knit in the inevitable Malabrigo yarns. Inevitable, because, let’s face it, I love Malabrigo. I am not the best at colorwork, so the thick Malabrigo Worsted made this a breeze, since it knits up fast and limits the amount of colorwork you actually need to do. Stranded colorwork meant a lot of loose strands inside the cowl and I was worried about snagging, so I used some Malabrigo Lace to knit a lining. If you haven’t knit with Lace, it’s kitten soft and just a delight against the skin, which means that my cowl is unbelievably warm and soft. I made it a bit oversized to compensate for the extreme warmth of a stranded, lined merino cowl.

Myrna

Finally, Myrna. Myrna hasn’t gotten a lot of attention on Ravelry since I added it, but in some ways, it’s my favorite pattern in the lot. Knit in Sanguine Gryphon Bugga!, I wanted to utilize what I think is the absolutely perfect stitch quality of the yarn. It knits up more neatly than almost any other yarn I’ve worked with, and I wanted to show off the color and quality of the yarn. Myrna is knit on small needles to create a neat, stretchy set of mitts with negative ease. There is nothing fancy about these mitts other than the yarn and the button tab. They’re simple as can be, but perhaps because of that, they’re my favorite to wear. The matching cowl uses stripes of stockinette and a textured slip stitch lace pattern that creates little half moons all around. Another button tab pulls the cowl down in front and turns the stripes into a gentle accordion shape.

The whole collection is available for US $16.00.

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Apologies, etc.

January 8, 2011

My vow of getting better at posting here has gotten off to a rocky start. On my birthday, which was two days ago, I decided it would be fun to give something back, so I set up a few different Knitting Kninja related promotions on Ravelry. Did I then post here to let people know about that? No, I did not.

Basically, I noticed that the beginning of the year marks a spate of knitting resolutions among knitters, and saw many people adding one or another of my patterns to their queues in preparation to meet some goal in the coming year. The majority of these folks were part of a group wanting to knit 11 shawls in 2011. In response, I have two shawl related deals underway for the remainder of the month and one baby knitting deal. All of these deals are automatic when you check out, so no coupon code needed.

Deal 1: Buy Two Ladies, get $1 off Rosa. All three shawls for $15.50.

Deal 2: Purchase Clothilde or Arabella individually, get Beetle Tracks free.

Deal 3: Buy Surtsey, get Paulette free. Again, just add Paulette to your cart and it will be automatically discounted.

NOTE: Deal 2 originally read that you could buy ANY individual shawl and get Beetle Tracks free. However, including Rosa in that promotion was causing the first deal not to work, so I changed the parameters. If you’d like to purchase Rosa individually and get a free copy of Beetle Tracks, please email me or leave a comment here, on Twitter, Facebook, or Ravelry, and I will try to manually get the pattern to you as soon as possible. More apologies for the trouble this entails.

Rosa

December 1, 2010

The Rosa pattern is now live! Hip hip hooray!

Rosa is a small, elegant top down triangle shawlette with simple lace inserts, equally suitable for wear as a scarf or as an evening wrap. This is a gentle introduction to true lace, in which the yarn overs occur on both sides of the fabric. Choose a beautiful solid or semi solid light fingering weight yarn to best display the lace pattern, which has the look of paper cut outs. The Bluefaced Leicester yarn used for the sample is smooth and sturdy, but still soft on the skin. Merino is another good choice for a soft, wearable fabric. Finished with an easy vertical lace edging to mimic the look of fringe, this is a fast and fun lace project you’ll love to wear.

SIZE
50 inches wide, 20 inches long

MATERIALS

  • 430 yds light fingering weight yarn – Shown in Rocky Mountain Dyeworks Bow Falls Fingering (100% superwash Blue Faced Leicester, 430 yds per 100g skein, 1 skein used) Note: I used 1 skein for the sample, but with very little yarn left over. You may wish to purchase an extra skein for security.
  • 1 U.S. size 3 (3.25 mm) circular needle 24 inches or longer
  • 2 stitch markers
  • tapestry needle

GAUGE
24 sts/37 rows = 4 inches in stockinette st

Buy it now for U.S. $6.50!

Scramble

November 11, 2010

I’ve fallen behind in keeping up with this blog, which is a shame, as it’s something I really enjoy working on. However, I am going to take a current illness as an opportunity and update just a little.

This is Rosa. Rosa is currently out for test knitting, and the pattern will be available in December. I mentioned in passing a few times that I had an idea for an accessories collection. Rosa is not the first item I’ve finished for this collection, but she will be the first released. The other accessories for the collection will be a little delayed due to deadline projects, but the good news is that with Ravelry’s new promotional tools, purchasing Rosa now and the collection later won’t penalize early buyers for their loyalty. I will be able to discount the purchase of Rosa from the cost of the full ebook when it is ready, so you can have your cake and eat it too!

The patterns in the new collection are all named after women I admire for one reason or another. Rosa has a floral pattern and a Spanish feel, but that’s actually sort of coincidental, as the shawl was named after Rosa Parks long before I started it. The yarn is gorgeous Rocky Mountain Dyeworks Bow Falls Fingering, a light fingering weight yarn of Blue Faced Leicester wool. I loved working with the yarn, as the saturated color with just a little variegation revealed new depth and surprises after each row. This is an amazing red – there are at least three separate saturated reds at work here, meaning that the yarn revealed barely visible blues or yellows tinging the main vibrant shade as I knit with it. I used a very simple zig zag lace at the edging to mimic fringe.

It’s been a real pleasure to work on this collection. I’m actually in the midst of the largest project out of the lot – another shawl/wrap, this one quite large and involved – and while it’s taking a little while, I sincerely hope and believe the end result will be worth it.  I spent a lot of time on color with this bunch, and I’m glad of it, because color is what tends to keep me tied to a knitting project. I’m already planning more color palettes for the future, just because!