Archive for the ‘Shawls’ Category

Jolie with Pointy Sticks

August 18, 2012

Well! It only took me AGES, but I finally have a little collection of accessory patterns available, just in time for autumn.

I’ve talked a little about the philosophy behind this collection as I’ve worked on it, but I’m going to mention it again. The idea behind this collection was to create a somewhat cohesive set of accessories that could be mixed and matched to offset a fall and winter wardrobe. Like most knitters, I have an absolute ton of hats and cowls and mitts and such, but they’re often knit in isolation from one another and can’t really be worn together without making me look a little crazy. Watching old movies, one of the things that struck me about the curated wardrobes of the actresses was how well the accessories worked together. I wanted to create small patterns using minimal amounts of luxury yarn that would create a set of accessories that could be worn as part of a well matched wardrobe.

Myrna 3

Myrna cowl and mitts

I’ve listed two sets as individual patterns, meaning that while there are six patterns listed for the collection, there are actually instructions for eight different accessories: two hats, two cowls, two shawls, one set of mitts, and a cravat.

So let’s talk a little about the patterns! You’ve seen Rosa and Dorothy before.

Rosa and Dorothy

Rosa has been updated to include a second, larger size, and a second suggested yarn. Both suggested yarns are from Rocky Mountain Dyeworks. I love the rich colors that Hasmi, the creative force behind Rocky Mountain Dyeworks, teases out of fibers. The original red Rosa was knit in Bow Falls Fingering, a tight BFL. The new version is knit in Kicking Horse Sock, a merino/bamboo blend with a soft hand and oodles of drape. I asked Hasmi if she had any colors suggestive of a yellow rose, and she dyed me THREE absolutely gorgeous shades, which I alternated to create a subtle gradient from light to dark. I absolutely love the result. If you previously purchased Rosa, you should have received an update to the pattern, and if you wish to purchase the whole collection, the price of Rosa will be automatically discounted at purchase.

Dorothy is included in this collection as well, the only way to purchase the pattern through Knitting Kninja. Unlike my other shawl patterns, Dorothy is a raglan shawl, which makes it easy to drape over the shoulders and wear. It’s also easy to wrap around as a scarf. I used Knit Picks Imagination sock yarn for this version, an alpaca blend that adds a fuzzy halo to your knitting. Each section is fast and fun to knit, with a great deal of texture.

Clara

Clara is a bobble and lace hat. I don’t always love bobbles, but there’s something about a bobble hat that I adore. I have a saved picture in my files from ages ago of a bobble hat with diamond lace and I knew I wanted to make something similar one day. Clara is that something similar. It’s a one size hat, because the lace makes it very stretchy in order to fit a wide range of head sizes. Clara’s lace comes together in the decreases to make a star shaped top that just added to the fun little details. Knit in Sanguine Gryphon Traveller, it’s a warm hat despite the holes. I suggest substituting Cephalopod Yarns or Verdant Gryphon Traveller. Each skein is enough to make at least two hats.

Edith

Edith is a beret and cravat set knit in A Verb for Keeping Warm Metamorphosis. Metamorphosis is a gorgeous silk/merino blend with a somewhat rustic hand. The beret is covered in little twisted stitch cables that interlock and wind up the hat. They are echoed slightly in the ruffle cravat. The hat comes in two styles, a shallow beret (shown) and a slouchier version for those who want a little more substance. You can make a shallow beret and a cravat in any size from just one skein of yarn, which makes this a good value for an expensive and luxurious yarn.

Ida

Ida is a colorwork cowl knit in the inevitable Malabrigo yarns. Inevitable, because, let’s face it, I love Malabrigo. I am not the best at colorwork, so the thick Malabrigo Worsted made this a breeze, since it knits up fast and limits the amount of colorwork you actually need to do. Stranded colorwork meant a lot of loose strands inside the cowl and I was worried about snagging, so I used some Malabrigo Lace to knit a lining. If you haven’t knit with Lace, it’s kitten soft and just a delight against the skin, which means that my cowl is unbelievably warm and soft. I made it a bit oversized to compensate for the extreme warmth of a stranded, lined merino cowl.

Myrna

Finally, Myrna. Myrna hasn’t gotten a lot of attention on Ravelry since I added it, but in some ways, it’s my favorite pattern in the lot. Knit in Sanguine Gryphon Bugga!, I wanted to utilize what I think is the absolutely perfect stitch quality of the yarn. It knits up more neatly than almost any other yarn I’ve worked with, and I wanted to show off the color and quality of the yarn. Myrna is knit on small needles to create a neat, stretchy set of mitts with negative ease. There is nothing fancy about these mitts other than the yarn and the button tab. They’re simple as can be, but perhaps because of that, they’re my favorite to wear. The matching cowl uses stripes of stockinette and a textured slip stitch lace pattern that creates little half moons all around. Another button tab pulls the cowl down in front and turns the stripes into a gentle accordion shape.

The whole collection is available for US $16.00.

Dorothy

June 27, 2012

KnitPicks catalog Dorothy

Yesterday I opened my mailbox to find the Knit Picks catalog with my Dorothy shawl on the cover! Dorothy is a shawl I designed specifically with Knit Picks yarns in mind. It’s a two color raglan with very simple patterning that changes often enough to hold one’s interest throughout. It starts off with an easy slip stitch pattern that creates great texture, then moves on to an eyelet stripe, and finally ends with a very simple chevron lace.

You can purchase Dorothy as a kit (and at a discount) in one of two color pairings, or as an individual pattern. I had originally envisioned the shawl in red and white, so I’m thrilled that Knit Picks used that same color combo for their own version. I hadn’t pictured the brown and lime shawl, but I love it. It’s got real pop and a completely different character than the red and white shawl. (And it’s actually not far off from my swatch, which was knit in brown and hot pink.)

I will not be offering Dorothy as an individual pattern through Knitting Kninja, but I WILL be including it as a bonus pattern in an upcoming ebook that I have been struggling to finish. I hope you like it as much as I do! I think it’s a really fun summer accessory. I still need to get a good photograph of my own sample, which is knit in a completely different yarn (though very similar colors) to the version shown here. Knit Picks was out of the Stroll Tonal in the colors I wanted at the time, so I ended up using Imagination, their alpaca blend sock yarn. I really enjoyed using it and it created a rather lovely texture to my sample.

Grand Lake

March 21, 2012

Grand Lake, the shawl I designed for A Verb for Keeping Warm’s ProVerbial Club, is now available to everyone! There’s a lovely new sample, knit by a very talented sample knitter, and a new size, and some suggestions for modifications.

Grand Lake II 11

The new sample is knit in A Verb for Keeping Warm High Twist in Filigree, very different from the Floating used to create the original. Floating is a soft, haloed blend of alpaca, cashmere, and silk. High Twist is a tight twisted blend of merino and silk, strong and a bit ropelike before blocking. I think the way the pattern looks in each of these yarns gives a pretty good range to demonstrate the difference between different weights and different textures and how they affect a pattern. The High Twist is the light yellow, and the Floating is the warm pink.

Grand Lake 1.1

This shawl remains one of my personal favorite designs. I got to use so many beloved stitch patterns and ideas, and I think the end result is really pretty and special. The shawl is a dressy one, but as I think our second shoot demonstrates, it can be worn casually, too.

Grand Lake II 1

Although the stitch inspirations for Grand Lake come from fish scales and seashells, the end result reminded me strongly of architecture, specifically old movie theater architecture with its arches and flourishes and decorative motifs. Near Lake Merritt in Oakland, there is a 1920s movie palace called the Grand Lake. Kept open as a labor of love by its proprietors, the Grand Lake Theater is an Oakland landmark and a little piece of Americana with its beautifully cluttered mishmash of architectural styles. Wear your Grand Lake to a movie night and experience a little of the glamour of the old time movie palaces.

Grand Lake II 3

SIZE
Small: 52 inches wide, 21 inches in length
Large: 64 inches wide, 23 inches in length

MATERIALS

  • Small: 1 skein A Verb for Keeping Warm Floating 70% Alpaca, 20% Cashmere, 10% Silk; 400 yds per 100g skein
  • Large: 1 skein A Verb for Keeping Warm High Twist 70% Merino, 30% Silk; 660 yds per 100gm skein
  • Optional: 40 yards same weight yarn in contrast color for edging. Shown in Rocky Mountain Dyeworks Mistaya Lace.
  • Small: U.S. size 6 (4 mm) 24” or longer circular needle
  • Large U.S. size 5 (3.75 mm) 24” or longer circular needle
  • tapestry needle
  • stitch marker(s) (optional)

Grand Lake II 15

GAUGE
Small: 20 sts/29 rows = 4 inches in stockinette st on size 6 needles
Large: 21 sts/34 rows = 4 inches in stockinette st on size 5 needles

Tech edited by Lauren Cross.

Buy it now for $6.50 US

Treasures from Verb

August 1, 2011

It’s no secret that I love A Verb for Keeping Warm‘s yarns, and I live close enough to A Verb for Keeping Warm’s brick and mortar store that I can go there on a semi-regular basis. This is dangerous and wonderful all at once. I want ALL THE YARNS! Luckily, I have some small modicum of self restraint, and I am holding off from buying ALL THE YARNS until I’ve used up some of the yarns I already have. That doesn’t mean I haven’t gotten to play with Verb yarns in the meantime, though.

This year, Verb started its first yarn (or fiber) club, complete with four shawl patterns by four designers. I was designer number four, and I got to knit in the lovely and amazing Verb Floating, which is a delectable blend of alpaca, silk, and cashmere. Seriously, this stuff makes kitten fur feel like sandpaper. The color was an exclusive club shade of gorgeous corally pink, 2 Gems and a Pearl. I am not usually a fan of pink, nor do I think it flatters my skin tones, but Kristine managed to dye this yarn a pink that looks great on pretty much everyone. I have no idea how this is possible, but there you go.

I was excited by the fact that Verb is a local to me company, and I sought inspiration in the bay. One of my very favorite lace patterns is the one called Split Leaf in the first Barbara Walker treasury. Although I know it is an ostensibly arboreal pattern, I’ve always thought it looked more like scales. I also adapted an umbrella themed stitch pattern to create what I thought looked like a seashell edging. Fish scales and seashells, but the end result actually looked more like the architecture of old movie palaces than something sea related. The name of the pattern, Grand Lake, is after the beautiful old Grand Lake Theater in Oakland.

Getting to use such a luscious yarn and getting to work so many of my long held favorite ideas was a treat. Thank you so much to A Verb for Keeping Warm for including me in this first club!

The other Verb related object I have to show you is this Felicity hat knit in Verb Toasted.

I am the last knitter in the universe to make the Felicity hat, but it seems to be universally flattering to everyone. I love this hat so much and I will wear it often this winter. The color is Tidepool, and it is so so pretty. It reminds me of a smouldering volcano more than anything. I think I messed up the decreases of this hat somehow – mine certainly do not look like the ones I’ve seen in other people’s photographs – but I still love how it looks and wears. My husband told me I looked like a whaler and then a Jacobin on the day I finished it, and I’m choosing to take both remarks as compliments, because this is one damn cute chapeau.

What’s next for me in Verb yarn? I don’t exactly know, but I have this terribly inspiring skein of Creating just waiting for me to come up with something!

Arcadian Shawl

May 25, 2011

Arcadian Shawl modeled 1

I’m very happy to be able to release the Arcadian Shawl! This has been one of my favorite projects to date, helped in no small part by the beautiful yarn from A Verb for Keeping Warm. Seriously, if you can knit this in the suggested yarns, I highly recommend it, as it’s a rewarding experience. And what’s more, if you hurry, the Alpaca Silk is May’s Dyer Special from Verb! I think the natural dyes really make something special with this shawl.

Arcadian Shawl nasturtiums

Arcadia, before it was a city in Southern California, was a region in Ancient Greece. After the collapse of the Roman Empire, Arcadia became a concept, an idealized fantasy of perfect unspoiled rusticity. In the imaginations of western Europeans, Arcadia remained pristine, utopic, populated by happy shepherds and beautiful shepherdesses. The Arcadian Shawl is so named for its own faux rusticity, in which gorgeous luxury yarns are transformed into a simple but beautiful wrap. The lace edging for the shawl requires very little yarn, making this a great project for using up leftovers.

Arcadian Shawl detail

SIZE
Small: 55 inches wide, 18 inches long (shown in Small)
Medium: 63 inches wide, 20 inches long
Large: 78 inches wide, 25 inches long

MATERIALS

  • 1 (1, 2) skeins A Verb for Keeping Warm Alpaca Silk Yarn 70% Alpaca, 30% Silk; 310 yds per 112g skein for MC – shown in Magic Bean
  • 1 (1, 1) skein A Verb for Keeping Warm Metamorphosis 70% Superwash Merino, 30% Silk; 385 yds per 115 g skein for CC – shown in Nugget
  • U.S. size 6 (4 mm) 24” (or longer) circular needle
  • tapestry needle
  • stitch markers

GAUGE
16 sts/28 rows = 4 inches in stockinette using Alpaca Silk

Tech edited by Lauren Cross

Buy it now for $6.50 US.

Relief – win yarn and patterns

April 25, 2011

After the terrible earthquake hit Japan in March, relief efforts were almost instantaneous. The recovery process will be long and hard, though, and money will be needed continually for those relief efforts, long after the earthquake is gone from the news entirely. As always after a disaster, money is what is most needed. Donation of goods is costly and complicated and can hinder relief from going where it is needed, however good the intentions. Some knitwear designers have designed patterns, the income from which will go to charities doing work in Japan, and I may do something of the sort myself in the future, but for now, I’d like to hold a raffle to raise money for recovery efforts.

How to enter:

Donate $10 or more to a charity providing on the ground relief work in Japan. I used Charity Navigator to look up organizations working in the area, and am recommending donations to Direct Relief International, which gets a very high rating on Charity Navigator. If you’d prefer to donate to another organization, such as Médecins Sans Frontières or the Red Cross, that is fine with me.

Forward a copy of your donation receipt to knittingkninja AT gmail.com.

For each $10 you donate, your name will be entered once into a drawing to win one of the four prizes listed below. If you donate $20, that’s two entries. $50 is five entries. I will only give one prize per winner, though, to spread out the chances of winning.

The contest ends Monday, May 9th, when I will draw four winners.

Prizes:

#1: Becoming Art Gaia Fingering and Clothilde (click to see larger)

Becoming Art Gaia Fingering

Clothilde

This package includes a copy of the Clothilde  shawl pattern and a skein of Becoming Art Gaia Fingering in the Drawn colorway. If you already have a copy of Clothilde, you can either select a different pattern or I will be happy to gift Clothilde to the knitter of your choice. You can of course use the yarn for any pattern you so desire, but there is enough in the skein to knit a Clothilde shawl. Gaia Fingering is a 100% merino yarn in a single ply. It is NOT superwash, so care must be taken when washing it to avoid felting. I found this colorway unbelievably beautiful, and I hope you do, too.

#2: madelinetosh Tosh Sport and Beetle Tracks (click to see larger)

Beetle Tracks

madelinetosh Tosh Sport

This package includes a copy of the Beetle Tracks scarf pattern and a skein of madelinetosh Tosh Sport in the Charcoal colorway. The yarn is enough to knit a Beetle Tracks scarf, though of course you can use it for any project you see fit. If you already have a copy of Beetle Tracks, you can either select a different pattern or I will be happy to gift Beetle Tracks to a knitter of your choice. The yarn in this case is rather special, as I purchased it off of the madelinetosh Etsy store, and the full proceeds were already donated to charity work in Japan. This is a great way to pass it forward. Tosh Sport is 100% superwash merino.

#3: Rocky Mountain Dyeworks Bow Falls Fingering and Rosa (click to see larger)

Rosa

Bow Falls Fingering

This package includes the Rosa shawl pattern and a skein of Rocky Mountain Dyeworks Bow Falls Fingering, which is the yarn used in the original Rosa. I picked a skein in the gorgeous Strawberry Root colorway, a rich red with undertones of maroon and bright pink. If you already have a copy of Rosa, you can either select a different pattern or I will be happy to gift Rosa to a knitter of your choice. You can of course use the yarn for any project, but there is enough here to knit the Rosa shawl. Bow Falls Fingering is a 100% superwash Blue Faced Leicester yarn. I’m very fond of BFL, and I hope you’ll enjoy it as much as I do!

#4: Understory ebook

Understory is my new ebook of six accessory patterns knit in Malabrigo yarns. The winner will receive the ebook as well as each individual pattern PDF for Amanita Muscaria, Laetiporus, Lichen Beret, Light and Shade, Verdure, and the Woodpigeon Mitts. I had a lot of fun knitting the samples for this collection and I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

Here are some patterns available for sale on Ravelry that benefit charities working in Japan.

Sakaki, by Rosemary Hill

Mitered Crosses Blanket by Kay Gardiner

Comfort Slippers by Reiko Arato

The deep end of the crafting pool

April 22, 2011

Hannah Thiessen of Life on the Double Point used the above words to describe a post at Flint Knits and it struck me that this is the most perfect term to describe some of the brainy and witty crafting blogs I love. This is a terribly abbreviated list, but I thought that since I have removed my blogroll for being too long, it would be nice to occasionally highlight some of the (many, many) craft blogs I read, especially since I’ve gotten far more sporadic about commenting on blogs. The following are three craft blogs that I think offer more than just crafting, blogs that provide food for thought, an argument (in the best sense of the word), and the comforting thought that other people, too, are spending time thinking about the politics and history and context of craft. My apologies in advance about the cloying and possible sycophantic sounding paragraphs attached. When you’re making a list of things you really enjoy and admire, it’s hard not to sound like a bit of a fawning idiot.

I added this picture of black violets for no good reason except that it's SPRING and I've got flowers on the brain.

Needled – Kate of Needled has long been a person I’ve admired for both her crafting and her skill with thought and word. Every single one of her lovely designs is brilliantly conceived and executed, but more than that, her blog offers a place to learn about the history of craft and the often complicated relationship that women have had to it over the years. Kate’s blog is what mine wants to be when it grows up. The funniest thing happened the other day, actually, when my husband came home all excited to show me the most amazing article he’d found on this blog – I had to read it, I would love it – and he pulled up Needled and showed me a familiar post. Needled is just a damn good read, and I’m grateful that Kate writes it. I feel lucky to read.

Flint Knits – I already mentioned Flint Knits, but it bears repeating. Pam’s blog is a challenge to think and consider and draw your own conclusions. She’s funny and smart, and her blog makes me feel like I’m sitting down with a group of friends to argue and talk and work something out. We won’t all agree in the end, but the discussion is really interesting. Pam also has some beautiful and fun to knit patterns, and her blog is political, feminist, historical, and very American. I feel like that last word is important, because a lot of blogs I’ve enjoyed for their context are not American, and since I am myself American, I like having a political and aware American representation of the craft world to turn to. Oh, and there’s swearing.

Feather and Fan – Feather and Fan cracks me up and makes me think. This post about Ravelry and difficulty ratings is one that I wish I’d written myself, but it’s far more thorough and interesting than what I’d have written. She started the conversation on Ravelry that led to the creation of the Big Issues Debate group, and to a really interesting conversation that spanned many blogs and posts about knitting and feminism and choices. And when that deep end feels a little too deep, there are always baby sloths to give the brain a break.

In other news, I’m at work on a spring pattern from Knitting Kninja. Keep your eyes peeled for this shawl, knit in seriously luscious yarns from A Verb for Keeping Warm. I’m writing up the pattern currently, and if I stick to the schedule, it will be out in May!

Understory

April 11, 2011

This is one of the secret projects I’ve been diligently working on behind the scenes. As you may know, this year Malabrigo started a new program called the Malabrigo Freelance Pattern Project. Each month, an independent designer will release an ebook of Malabrigo patterns. I’m Miss April!

Understory is a collection of six accessory patterns with a woodsy theme. They are available individually, or all together in ebook form. (If you purchase the ebook, you will get an ebook and each of the individual files as well.) All patterns were test knit by a pool of knitters and tech edited by Lauren Cross.

Lichen Beret

Lichens and mosses are so miniscule and usual that they can easily be overlooked, but these tiny not-quite-plants are truly beautiful and fascinating. The Lichen Beret celebrates these Lilliputian wonders in larger form with a simple lace faggoting pattern that mimics some of the patterns of lichen fronds. Knit either in smooth Malabrigo Twist, or luxuriously fluffy Malabrigo Angora, very different looks can be achieved with the same easy pattern. Top with a fluffy pom pom for an especially cute look.

SIZE
One size fits most adult heads
18 inches in circumference at brim

MATERIALS

  • 1 skein Malabrigo Twist 100% Merino; 150 yds per 100g skein – shown in Olive OR
  • 2 skeins Malabrigo Angora 100% Angora; 50 yds per 60g skein – shown in Primavera
  • U.S. size 7 (4.5 mm) 16” circular needle
  • U.S. size 10 (6 mm) 16”circular needle
  • U.S. size 10 (6 mm) dpns or long circular needle for Magic Loop
  • tapestry needle
  • scrap yarn for optional pom pom (Shown in Malabrigo Merino Worsted in Dove)

GAUGE
16 sts/25 rows = 4 inches in stockinette stitch on size 7 needles
13 sts/20 rows = 4 inches in stockinette stitch on size 10 needles

Buy it now for U.S. $5.00

Laetiporus

Laetiporus is a genus of edible mushrooms that grow in brackets from living trees. The shelf like construction and bright yellow color make for a spectacular sight in the damp woods. The Laetiporus scarf mimics, with a wide and gentle garter ruffle, the broad ripples of Laetiporus mushrooms. Although the scarf pictured here is extremely long, the simple lace and short row ruffle pattern can be made to any desired length for an unsual and wearable scarf that will stand out and keep your neck toasty warm. Refer to the chart or the written pattern to meet your comfort level.

SIZE
8 inches wide by 100 inches long

MATERIALS

  • 3 skeins Malabrigo Merino Worsted 100% Merino wool; 210 yds per 100g skein – shown in Frank Ochre
  • U.S. size 10 (6 mm) needles
  • tapestry needle

GAUGE
15 sts/20 rows = 4 inches in stockinette stitch on size 10 needles

Buy it now for U.S. $5.00

Amanita Muscaria

The Amanita Muscaria mushroom is one of the most iconic fungi around. The cheery red cap with the white spots disguises the fact that the mushroom is actually quite poisonous. These happy mitts have all the geniality of the Amanita Muscaria mushroom with none of the danger. The simple stranded colorwork pattern makes an easy introduction to stranded colorwork or a relaxing interlude for those already familiar with the technique. Change the colors around for a fun polka dot look. In lightweight Malabrigo Sock, these mitts are perfect for nippy spring weather.

SIZE
one size fits most adult hands

MATERIALS

  • 1 skein Malabrigo Sock 100% Superwash Merino; 440 yds per 100g skein in MC – shown in Natural
  • 1 skein Malabrigo Sock 100% Superwash Merino; 440 yds per 100g skein in CC – shown in Ravelry Red
  • U.S. size 1 (2.25 mm) dpns or long circular needle for Magic Loop
  • U.S. size 2.5 (3 mm) dpns or long circular needle for Magic Loop
  • tapestry needle
  • waste yarn

GAUGE
30 sts/32 rows = 4 inches in colorwork pattern in larger needles

Buy it now for U.S. $5.00

Verdure

April’s lush new growth fills the woodland floors in a riot of bright young greens and fast growing leafy plants reaching for the light before the canopy fills in entirely. This shawl, composed of different leaf shapes and Faroese construction, is inspired by the verdant hues and herbage of spring. Both sizes result in a true shawl rather than a shawlette, good for wrapping around a short sleeved top or light dress on a cool evening. Both samples were knit in spring greens, but it would be easy to change the season by changing the colors. Greys or whites for frosty winter, oranges, reds, or golds for autumn, deep greens for summer.

NOTE: There are two PDFs, one labeled charts, one labeled written. These are identical in content, but have different layouts to more easily facilitate chart users or those who rely on the written pattern. Both have the charts and the written pattern.

SIZES
Small: 60 inches wide, 24 inches long
Large: 85 inches wide, 34 inches long

MATERIALS

  • 2 skeins Malabrigo Sock for size Small 100% Superwash Merino; 440 yds per 100g skein – shown in Lettuce
  • 4 skeins Malabrigo Silky Merino for size Large 51% Silk, 49% Merino; 150 yds per 50g skein – shown in Manzanilla Olive
  • U.S. size 6 (4 mm) 24” or longer circular needle for size Small
  • U.S. size 8 (5 mm) 24” or longer circular needle for size Large
  • tapestry needle

GAUGE
Small: 26 sts/34 rows = 4 inches in stockinette stitch on size 6 needles
Large: 19 sts/24 rows = 4 inches in stockinette stitch on size 8 needle

Buy now for U.S. $6.50

Light and Shade

Variegated yarns frequently call my name, but I often have trouble knitting them up. Patterns that looked beautiful in theory can look messy in reality. Light and Shade is a simple cowl designed for use with those tough but beautiful Malabrigo variegateds. The slip stitch honeycomb pattern breaks up the colors and gives a look of dappled light rather than pooling or messiness. An attached i-cord edging makes a neat, tailored edge that looks great without much effort. The button placket is a great opportunity to use some pretty buttons and the cowl sits differently depending on how many holes you button.

SIZE
Small: 7 inches high, 20 inches wide.
Large: 7 inches high, 24 inches wide.

MATERIALS

  • 1 skein Malabrigo Merino Worsted 100% Merino; 210 yds per 100g skein – shown in Jaen (Small) and Mariposa (Large)
  • 1 set U.S. size 6 (4 mm) needles
  • 1 set U.S. size 10 (6 mm) needles
  • 3 buttons (19 mm)
  • tapestry needle

GAUGE
15 sts/20 rows = 4 inches in stockinette stitch on size 10 needles

Buy it now for U.S. $4.00

Woodpigeon Mitts

Spring brings a host of avian life to the woods, and the sounds and sights of birds fill the usually quiet groves and thickets. The Woodpigeon Mitts take a simple feathered lace pattern inspired by some of the feathered occupants of the forest, and create a dramatic and dashing fitted mitt that is light and warm. The elbow length mitts can easily be shortened for a more everyday look, while the longer version hints at old movie star glamour and sophistication.

SIZE
Small, Large

MATERIALS

  • 2 skeins Malabrigo Silky Merino 51% Silk, 49% Merino; 150 yds per 50g skein – shown in Cape Cod Gray
  • 1 set U.S. size 5 (3.75 mm) dpns OR long circular needle for Magic Loop
  • tapestry needle

GAUGE
22 sts/30 rows = 4 inches in stockinette stitch

Buy it now for U.S. $5.00

Or buy the whole collection at a discount of almost 50% for U.S. $16.00

Apologies, etc.

January 8, 2011

My vow of getting better at posting here has gotten off to a rocky start. On my birthday, which was two days ago, I decided it would be fun to give something back, so I set up a few different Knitting Kninja related promotions on Ravelry. Did I then post here to let people know about that? No, I did not.

Basically, I noticed that the beginning of the year marks a spate of knitting resolutions among knitters, and saw many people adding one or another of my patterns to their queues in preparation to meet some goal in the coming year. The majority of these folks were part of a group wanting to knit 11 shawls in 2011. In response, I have two shawl related deals underway for the remainder of the month and one baby knitting deal. All of these deals are automatic when you check out, so no coupon code needed.

Deal 1: Buy Two Ladies, get $1 off Rosa. All three shawls for $15.50.

Deal 2: Purchase Clothilde or Arabella individually, get Beetle Tracks free.

Deal 3: Buy Surtsey, get Paulette free. Again, just add Paulette to your cart and it will be automatically discounted.

NOTE: Deal 2 originally read that you could buy ANY individual shawl and get Beetle Tracks free. However, including Rosa in that promotion was causing the first deal not to work, so I changed the parameters. If you’d like to purchase Rosa individually and get a free copy of Beetle Tracks, please email me or leave a comment here, on Twitter, Facebook, or Ravelry, and I will try to manually get the pattern to you as soon as possible. More apologies for the trouble this entails.

Rosa

December 1, 2010

The Rosa pattern is now live! Hip hip hooray!

Rosa is a small, elegant top down triangle shawlette with simple lace inserts, equally suitable for wear as a scarf or as an evening wrap. This is a gentle introduction to true lace, in which the yarn overs occur on both sides of the fabric. Choose a beautiful solid or semi solid light fingering weight yarn to best display the lace pattern, which has the look of paper cut outs. The Bluefaced Leicester yarn used for the sample is smooth and sturdy, but still soft on the skin. Merino is another good choice for a soft, wearable fabric. Finished with an easy vertical lace edging to mimic the look of fringe, this is a fast and fun lace project you’ll love to wear.

SIZE
50 inches wide, 20 inches long

MATERIALS

  • 430 yds light fingering weight yarn – Shown in Rocky Mountain Dyeworks Bow Falls Fingering (100% superwash Blue Faced Leicester, 430 yds per 100g skein, 1 skein used) Note: I used 1 skein for the sample, but with very little yarn left over. You may wish to purchase an extra skein for security.
  • 1 U.S. size 3 (3.25 mm) circular needle 24 inches or longer
  • 2 stitch markers
  • tapestry needle

GAUGE
24 sts/37 rows = 4 inches in stockinette st

Buy it now for U.S. $6.50!